Cultivation Resources

Cultivation & Conservation Classes

Cultivation & Conservation Classes

A Grower's Track and Cultivation & Conservation Track were presented at the 2017 and 2019 International Herb Symposium. Both have been made available here with support from the Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation. Select a track title below to read the class descriptions and listen to the audio recordings. Grower’s Track (IHS 2017) Botanical, Macroscopic and Organoleptic Assessment of Herbal Ingredients for cGMP | Steven Yeager This hands-on workshop will provide a comprehensive orientation of botanical, ...
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Michael examining the understory

Creating New Forests for Medicinal Plants

By Michael Pilarski Michael examining the understory in his 25-year old medicinal agroforestry planting. Black cohosh, Viola odorata, and many species of tree seedlings. United Plant Savers has done great work with 1) preserving what we currently have; and 2) encouraging more farming of medicinal plants to reduce wildcrafting pressures, 3) encouraging forest-grown herbs. Here are a few thoughts on a 4th way: Creating new forests for medicinal production and wildcrafting habitat. We can use ...
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black cohosh

Black Cohosh Cultivation & Growing Guide.

Originally published in The Forest Farmers Handbook: A Beginners Guide to Growing and Marketing At-Risk Forest Herbs by United Plant Savers & Rural Action (available here). Overview (Actaea racemosa)Ranunculaceae Black cohosh is a perennial species that is commonly found growing along forest edges and in deeply shaded forest interiors throughout eastern North America. Black cohosh plants can grow as a single or multiple stem, each with three compound leaves containing multiple serrated leaflets. Plants are ...
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bloodroot

Bloodroot Cultivation & Growing Guide.

Originally published in The Forest Farmers Handbook: A Beginners Guide to Growing and Marketing At-Risk Forest Herbs by United Plant Savers & Rural Action (available here). Overview (Sanguinaria canadensis)Papaveraceae Bloodroot is one of the most iconic and well-known spring wildflowers found in the deciduous forests of eastern North America. As an ephemeral species, bloodroot is one of the first plants to emerge and bloom in the spring, thus ensuring sufficient time for plants to capture ...
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goldenseal

Goldenseal Cultivation & Growing Guide.

Originally published in The Forest Farmers Handbook: A Beginners Guide to Growing and Marketing At-Risk Forest Herbs by United Plant Savers & Rural Action (available here). Overview Hydrastis canadensis(Ranunculaceae) Goldenseal is considered to be one of the most at-risk medicinal plants in the United States and is estimated to be at a high risk of extinction throughout its native range (Oliver, 2017). Goldenseal is typically found growing in densely clustered patches (Burkhart and Jacobson, 2006) on ...
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Allium tricoccum Allium burdickii (Amaryllidaceae)

Ramps Cultivation & Growing Guide

Originally published in The Forest Farmers Handbook: A Beginners Guide to Growing and Marketing At-Risk Forest Herbs by United Plant Savers & Rural Action (available here). Overview Allium tricoccumAllium burdickii(Amaryllidaceae) There are two species of ramps (Allium tricoccum and Allium burdickii) commonly found in the forests of eastern North America. These species are similar in physical appearance and flavor profile and will be simply referred to as “ramps” throughout this publication. Ramps are one of ...
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ginseng

American Ginseng Cultivation & Growing Guide.

Originally published in The Forest Farmers Handbook: A Beginners Guide to Growing and Marketing At-Risk Forest Herbs by United Plant Savers & Rural Action (available here). Overview (Panax quinquefolius)Araliaceae American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) is a long-lived perennial herb that is native to the deciduous forests of eastern North America. Due to its high value, which can range from $600 to more than $1,000 per dried pound, American ginseng has been over-harvested throughout much of its ...
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